departurelane:

Glowing Gently
 
A simple pattern and even simpler concept can create a unique atmosphere in any space.Designer: Studio Joa Herrenknecht departurelane:

Glowing Gently
 
A simple pattern and even simpler concept can create a unique atmosphere in any space.Designer: Studio Joa Herrenknecht

departurelane:

Glowing Gently

 

A simple pattern and even simpler concept can create a unique atmosphere in any space.

Designer: Studio Joa Herrenknecht

design-beats:

Beeloved, designed by Serbian student Tamara Mihajlovic is a perfect example of quality branding. design-beats:

Beeloved, designed by Serbian student Tamara Mihajlovic is a perfect example of quality branding. design-beats:

Beeloved, designed by Serbian student Tamara Mihajlovic is a perfect example of quality branding. design-beats:

Beeloved, designed by Serbian student Tamara Mihajlovic is a perfect example of quality branding. design-beats:

Beeloved, designed by Serbian student Tamara Mihajlovic is a perfect example of quality branding.

design-beats:

Beeloved, designed by Serbian student Tamara Mihajlovic is a perfect example of quality branding.

9prodlums:

Polygons measuring spoon

9prodlums:

Polygons measuring spoon
theenergyissue:

Second Life: The Heineken WOBO Doubles as Beer Bottle and Brick
Fifty years ago, Heineken developed a revolutionary and sustainable design solution to give its beer bottles a second life: as an architectural brick. The concept arose after brewing magnate Alfred Heineken visited Curacao during a world tour of his factories in 1960. He was struck by the amount of beer bottles—many bearing his name—littering the beaches and the lack of affordable building materials for residents. In a stroke of genius (or madness), Heineken realized both problems could be solved if beer bottles could be reused as structural building components. Enlisting the help of Dutch architect N. John Habraken, Heineken created a new bottled design—dubbed the Heineken WOBO (World Bottle)—that doubled as a drinking vessel and a brick. As author and architecture critic Martin Pawley notes, the WOBO was “the first mass production container ever designed from the outset for secondary use as a building component.” The new squared off bottle was both inter-locking and self-aligning, allowing it to nestle seamlessly and snugly into adjoining “bricks.” With Habraken’s design, a 10 by 10 foot hut could be constructed with 1,000 WOBO bottles. Though a test run of 100,000 bottles was produced in 1963, the marketing department’s worries about liabilities doomed the project. The WOBO was subsequently and unceremoniously retired. Though only two official WOBO buildings remain, both on the Heineken estate in Noordwijk near Amsterdam, the concept remains a powerful and inspiring one. Indeed, the experiment is a reminder of how a major corporation might seriously take on sustainability in an innovative way. theenergyissue:

Second Life: The Heineken WOBO Doubles as Beer Bottle and Brick
Fifty years ago, Heineken developed a revolutionary and sustainable design solution to give its beer bottles a second life: as an architectural brick. The concept arose after brewing magnate Alfred Heineken visited Curacao during a world tour of his factories in 1960. He was struck by the amount of beer bottles—many bearing his name—littering the beaches and the lack of affordable building materials for residents. In a stroke of genius (or madness), Heineken realized both problems could be solved if beer bottles could be reused as structural building components. Enlisting the help of Dutch architect N. John Habraken, Heineken created a new bottled design—dubbed the Heineken WOBO (World Bottle)—that doubled as a drinking vessel and a brick. As author and architecture critic Martin Pawley notes, the WOBO was “the first mass production container ever designed from the outset for secondary use as a building component.” The new squared off bottle was both inter-locking and self-aligning, allowing it to nestle seamlessly and snugly into adjoining “bricks.” With Habraken’s design, a 10 by 10 foot hut could be constructed with 1,000 WOBO bottles. Though a test run of 100,000 bottles was produced in 1963, the marketing department’s worries about liabilities doomed the project. The WOBO was subsequently and unceremoniously retired. Though only two official WOBO buildings remain, both on the Heineken estate in Noordwijk near Amsterdam, the concept remains a powerful and inspiring one. Indeed, the experiment is a reminder of how a major corporation might seriously take on sustainability in an innovative way. theenergyissue:

Second Life: The Heineken WOBO Doubles as Beer Bottle and Brick
Fifty years ago, Heineken developed a revolutionary and sustainable design solution to give its beer bottles a second life: as an architectural brick. The concept arose after brewing magnate Alfred Heineken visited Curacao during a world tour of his factories in 1960. He was struck by the amount of beer bottles—many bearing his name—littering the beaches and the lack of affordable building materials for residents. In a stroke of genius (or madness), Heineken realized both problems could be solved if beer bottles could be reused as structural building components. Enlisting the help of Dutch architect N. John Habraken, Heineken created a new bottled design—dubbed the Heineken WOBO (World Bottle)—that doubled as a drinking vessel and a brick. As author and architecture critic Martin Pawley notes, the WOBO was “the first mass production container ever designed from the outset for secondary use as a building component.” The new squared off bottle was both inter-locking and self-aligning, allowing it to nestle seamlessly and snugly into adjoining “bricks.” With Habraken’s design, a 10 by 10 foot hut could be constructed with 1,000 WOBO bottles. Though a test run of 100,000 bottles was produced in 1963, the marketing department’s worries about liabilities doomed the project. The WOBO was subsequently and unceremoniously retired. Though only two official WOBO buildings remain, both on the Heineken estate in Noordwijk near Amsterdam, the concept remains a powerful and inspiring one. Indeed, the experiment is a reminder of how a major corporation might seriously take on sustainability in an innovative way.

theenergyissue:

Second Life: The Heineken WOBO Doubles as Beer Bottle and Brick

Fifty years ago, Heineken developed a revolutionary and sustainable design solution to give its beer bottles a second life: as an architectural brick. The concept arose after brewing magnate Alfred Heineken visited Curacao during a world tour of his factories in 1960. He was struck by the amount of beer bottles—many bearing his name—littering the beaches and the lack of affordable building materials for residents. In a stroke of genius (or madness), Heineken realized both problems could be solved if beer bottles could be reused as structural building components. Enlisting the help of Dutch architect N. John Habraken, Heineken created a new bottled design—dubbed the Heineken WOBO (World Bottle)—that doubled as a drinking vessel and a brick. As author and architecture critic Martin Pawley notes, the WOBO was “the first mass production container ever designed from the outset for secondary use as a building component.” The new squared off bottle was both inter-locking and self-aligning, allowing it to nestle seamlessly and snugly into adjoining “bricks.” With Habraken’s design, a 10 by 10 foot hut could be constructed with 1,000 WOBO bottles. Though a test run of 100,000 bottles was produced in 1963, the marketing department’s worries about liabilities doomed the project. The WOBO was subsequently and unceremoniously retired. Though only two official WOBO buildings remain, both on the Heineken estate in Noordwijk near Amsterdam, the concept remains a powerful and inspiring one. Indeed, the experiment is a reminder of how a major corporation might seriously take on sustainability in an innovative way.

takeovertime:

Desk Collection | Grovemade takeovertime:

Desk Collection | Grovemade takeovertime:

Desk Collection | Grovemade

takeovertime:

Desk Collection | Grovemade

88floors:

Quercus by Max Ashford 88floors:

Quercus by Max Ashford 88floors:

Quercus by Max Ashford 88floors:

Quercus by Max Ashford 88floors:

Quercus by Max Ashford 88floors:

Quercus by Max Ashford

88floors:

Quercus by Max Ashford

mayahan:

Iceberg Candles

Gentle Giants Studio designed a collection of candles that reflect the icebergs that are melting away. Called BERGY BIT, the line is named after the scientific definition of a medium-sized iceberg that begins as part of a larger glacier that breaks apart.
mayahan:

Iceberg Candles

Gentle Giants Studio designed a collection of candles that reflect the icebergs that are melting away. Called BERGY BIT, the line is named after the scientific definition of a medium-sized iceberg that begins as part of a larger glacier that breaks apart.
mayahan:

Iceberg Candles

Gentle Giants Studio designed a collection of candles that reflect the icebergs that are melting away. Called BERGY BIT, the line is named after the scientific definition of a medium-sized iceberg that begins as part of a larger glacier that breaks apart.
mayahan:

Iceberg Candles

Gentle Giants Studio designed a collection of candles that reflect the icebergs that are melting away. Called BERGY BIT, the line is named after the scientific definition of a medium-sized iceberg that begins as part of a larger glacier that breaks apart.
mayahan:

Iceberg Candles

Gentle Giants Studio designed a collection of candles that reflect the icebergs that are melting away. Called BERGY BIT, the line is named after the scientific definition of a medium-sized iceberg that begins as part of a larger glacier that breaks apart.

mayahan:

Iceberg Candles

Gentle Giants Studio designed a collection of candles that reflect the icebergs that are melting away. Called BERGY BIT, the line is named after the scientific definition of a medium-sized iceberg that begins as part of a larger glacier that breaks apart.

wetheurban:


DESIGN: The Pocket Printer by Zuta Labs
The Zuta Labs’ pocket printer has apparently made mobile printing a dream come true.
Read More

wetheurban:

DESIGN: The Pocket Printer by Zuta Labs

The Zuta Labs’ pocket printer has apparently made mobile printing a dream come true.

Read More